Chickens, Farming, For Sale, Maple Syrup, Meat Animals

Changes

This has been a year changes for our family and it is only April 1st! We have decided that we need to change our focus on the farm.  Since I am still recovering from my surgery, I tire easily, we decided that we needed to shift our priorities to spend more time with our children right now and less time farming. We will still be growing meat for ourselves on the homestead, but we have decided not to grow meat to sell anymore.

Instead we are going to focus on growing our maple syrup production! This is a wonderful venture that we are undertaking with a lot of excitement and joy as it is our favorite part of the farm; from checking the sap lines and installing new ones in the forest, identifying animal prints in the snow, sitting in the sugar house while sap is boiling away, smelling the sweet steam, watching the water vapors rise to the cupola and drift out of the sugar house on rays of sunshine, seeing the beautiful colors of the maple syrup as it is bottled and cleaning up after each run, getting to taste the drips and the extra bits of each batch of syrup, to our big Maine Maple Sunday party! We just love this part of farming so focusing on this seems like the right direction for us to go.

We still have meat in the freezer from 2018 that we would love to have you put in your freezer instead of ours. We will have the freezer in the sugar house open for the rest of this week then we will be moving the meat to our freezer inside and it will only be available if you call ahead or stop by when we are home.

The seedlings are started for tomatoes and peppers and some flowers that A wanted to plant. Greens have been planted in the greenhouse (I found one tiny kale plant that had seeded itself, growing in the greenhouse when I was planting this years springs greens!). I may have tomato seedlings for sale in a couple months – I planted way too many tomatoes and peppers!

Spring is for new beginnings and we are beginning with a new plan for the future, we look forward to seeing you all soon!

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Farming, Life

Busy Season?

Oh, this is supposed to be the slow season? I feel this every year, we should be relaxing into winter, cozying up and spending time together. Instead, we are busy, busy, busy. For us this year it means, still cutting firewood and building a WWOOFER cabin. WWOOFER’s are people that work on your farm in exchange for food and shelter. This was our first year having wwoofers and one thing that was lacking was somewhere warm for people to stay during our winter season, otherwise known as preparing for sap season.

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River has been working on the cabin and it is coming along just fine. a composting toilet, bunk beds, desk area, wood stove, and an area for a comfy love seat is coming together very nicely. The electrical is complete and the insulation is in. The wood stove is in and the doors and windows are ready to go up. Once the door is on, the mudding and taping can commence. I am going for white as the paint color in here, it is a small space.

The boys are excited that they will have a tiny home to stay in if they want when workers aren’t there.

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Where the bunks will be
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The bathroom area

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This is all very exciting and time consuming, I can’t wait for it to be done!

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We used siding off a building we took down that was shorter but then this cabin so we had to piece it together. Use what you have, make do or do without is the old saying I believe…

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Farming, Fruit, Vegetables

What’s growing in the garden

This is a little update on our garden and what is growing right now.

We haven’t had a lot of success with fruit this year, only 5 quarts of canned peaches, no blueberries and no apples, apricots or plums on our trees this year, so I was thrilled that our Musk Melons actually grew to an edible size this year and thrived! We have eaten one delicious, juicy melon so far and there are several more on the way! So exciting!

Also exciting our delicious ever bearing raspberries, this variety, that I cannot remember the name of is sooooo sweet. My friend Kaite said it is one of the sweetest raspberries she has had in a long time.

 

Our peppers are exploding with yellow, orange, green, purple and jalapeno peppers galore! Some will get chopped and put in the freezer for stirfries and some will go in tomato sauce.

Our basil is going like crazy even though we had some wet and humid weather. I have dried quite a bit of it for gifts and use during the winter. I have also frozen quite a bit of it with garlic, but not cheese and nuts. This is my first year with really booming basil plants. I have been very excited about this success.

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Our weedy beets. They are growing great, even without a lot of attention.

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I was trying to avoid my winter squash plants growing all over the garden this year. I managed to get help with one trellis for our squash, I needed at least 4. I love how well it seems to be working in this section. It has kept many of the pumpkins contained and I can’t wait to see how they look when they turn orange. It will be so pretty. Next year more trellis before these beautiful plants take over the garden!

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What I was hoping to avoid was the squash taking over the overgrown raspberries so I could fix that bed how I wanted it this fall, hahaha. Clearly not going to happen right now!

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As you can see, the squash is temporarily taking over the raspberry bed and the pathways in the garden at the moment. My trellis idea would have worked really well if I had gotten the rest of it up in time. It is at least a two person operation to get it up and it wasn’t a priority this year. It will be next year to keep me sane!

We have been eating a lot of summer squash this summer. I thought I had one zucchini plant and three summer squash. It turned out I had four summer squash plants and no zucchini. I did end up with a volunteer zucchini plant in the beans. We got one zucchini on it. Better then nothing I say!

 

I have swiss chard and kale up the wazoo, but my salad greens didn’t come up this time, too hot perhaps?

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One of my favorite garden surprises was the tomatillo plant that was gorgeous, but not producing. I have it on a large trellis and thought perhaps it needed a buddy to make fruit. The other day we were in the garden and noticed that there are some fruits growing! It is just a late producer! So strange, but so exciting, I can’t wait for tomatillos to make salsa!

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Our carrots, planted very late are looking good, it has been a struggle to keep the children from eating them all now!

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We also have cucumbers, yummy! Number 2 likes them straight from the vine and Number 3 only likes pickled cucumbers, Number 1 doesn’t care for them at all, so it is a mixed bag around here!

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Tomatoes are starting to come in like crazy, yeah for tomato sauce, ketchup and salsa!

 

Our leeks are looking well too!

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Sweet potato vines are growing well, the true test will be when we dig them up to see if we have vole damage like last year. These are the vines I started this year, so I am excited to see how they produce!

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Our garden this year has been late, but beautiful, some things have been disappointing and others have been exciting and unexpected.

Every year on a farm brings new challenges, we learn from them and hope we are able to improve our knowledge for the next year. We are always learning and always up for the challenge even though it can be exhausting!

Farming, Food storage, Vegetables

Blight

Things have been really busy on the farm, it is amazing how many things need to be done at the same time! Our most recent adventure in farming involves a potato blight. My research has led to the conclusion that this blight is related to the Irish Potato Blight that led to the Irish immigrants coming to America. Potato blight is caused by a fungus called Phytophthora Infestans.  Humid weather plays a huge part in the blight taking hold of potatoes, and the last few weeks have had several days of over 90% humidity so I am not surprised that we have gotten blighted. Blight is carried through the air so unless your crop is completely surrounded and covered to keep out any breeze, you are lucky to avoid the blight. We planted 70 pounds of potatoes in a new field this year and I was hoping we could avoid the blight here since no crops had been grown recently. No such luck. We got it bad. I spent three of our hottest, humid mornings last week removing all the potato stalks from our plants and putting them in trash bags so we can hopefully preserve the potatoes in the ground.

I had noticed some brown on our plants and deluded myself into thinking it was just from the potato bugs that were showing up. No such luck, I dug some potatoes, they tasted great by the way, then I noticed a couple of rotten potatoes in our storage bin. Hmmmm. they had been perfectly good when I dug them up, then I realized that some of our stalks were looking soft and squishy, aha, the blight. Awesome.

Some people burn the stalks as they start to show signs of blight. We don’t have the equipment to do this so I cut them and threw them away. What I have read is to keep the potatoes in the ground for three weeks to try to prevent the blight from taking a hold of the actual potatoes. Cross your fingers, I am certainly crossing mine!

I have had late blight on my tomatoes for several years and I have managed to control it and still keep a crop by removing any infected leaves, keeping vines off the ground and mulching with either plastic or hay. I spent Saturday removing blighted tomato vines from the plants and throwing them away. I also trimmed back a lot of the lower vines to keep them away from splash back off the ground. My tomatoes are just starting to ripen this year so I am desperate to keep it from taking hold which means a trip to the tomatoes every day to remove anything suspicious looking.

Ahhhh, I dream of really cold weather this winter. Be gone blight and ticks!

Farming, Recipes, Vegetables, What’s For Dinner

What’s for Dinner? New Potatoes and Peas

‘Tis the season for new potatoes and peas. If you have never had a fresh new potato dug from the garden or a local garden, do yourself a favor and go to the farmers market to get some. There is no comparison between a freshly dug new potato where the skin is peeling off and a potato that has been saved for storage. They are fresh, they are crisp, they are amazing. Slice one and cook it up with a couple garlic scapes. You won’t believe how good it is!

 

My dad’s family is from Northern Maine, potato country, and this is a recipe that we have eaten since I was little. My grandmother used to make it every time we went to Limestone.

Step one: get the children to stop eating all the peas before they get to the house…

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Everything looks so fresh and yummy!

Step two: Clean your potatoes gently, the skin is tender so you don’t need to peel it or anything. Just wash gently and chop the potatoes into bite sized pieces, better yet, get your children to help you, our five year old is a pro.

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The photo is a little steamy looking…so, so good, just imagine the creamy, buttery, salty, new potato taste.

Boil potatoes gently in water until mostly cooked. Add your fresh peas and cook for about three minutes. Drain the water and add cream and butter, bring to a simmer. Add salt and pepper to taste and stir gently. At this point your potatoes will be gently cooking and should be almost done.

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These are actually the left overs, they are so good, my boys even like them cold…

The best way to eat this dish is by mashing your plate of peas and potatoes together so they absorb as much of the buttery cream as possible. So delicious, if I had a photo of me eating my first bite of the year I would post it, I’m sure it would have shown a look of pure pleasure…

We had this as a side with lobster…so tasty!

Farming, Meat Animals, Vegetables, What’s For Dinner

What’s For Dinner? Summer Squash

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Yummy!

We harvested our first summer squash today from the garden, I’m not sure how many more squash will appear from this beauty. My huge and beautiful summer squash plant, has been damaged, my guess is by a boy…they are sure it wasn’t, but you know, summer squash is in the greenhouse this year, so not so many other creatures could damage our plants…

Tonight I made a lovely dish, I put chopped up garlic scapes in some bacon grease and sauteed them while #2 sliced the squash, then I added the summer squash and sauteed until cooked adding salt and pepper. When they were fully cooked I added chopped basil and turned off the stove.

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In progress

I also made a lovely salad with leaf lettuce, cilantro, basil and oregano. I added some apple (procured in the discount basket at the local market), goat cheese (I usually like to make my own, my brothers goats aren’t producing enough for me to barter with them right now), balsamic vinegar and olive oil, soooo delicious!

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The finished product, so delicious!

I sauteed up a ham steak just to warm it slightly to serve on the side.

All the greens and veggies and the ham was from our farm, I love that!

Enjoy what you can produce on your land, everyone can grow

Farming, Meat Animals

This Little Piggie Stayed Home…

We have piggies! Our piggies are happily rooting up the hillside at Mahalo Farm with there piggies. Mahalo Farm has an area that needs to be cleaned up in preparation for a future orchard. It is awesome that while growing our food, we can also prepare an area for growing more food!

Check out Mahalo Farm on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/MahaloFarmME/

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These little piggies love to be scratched all over…